Tag Archives: monicadevine

Monica Devine: March River Walk

I walk the river discovering a new direction where
cutbanks have sloughed off and bending

trees lean with a weary creak

meltwater seeps up, whirlpools suck down and

everything is on the verge of

falling in, falling off, falling apart

like that time on the Kusko

when we had to race around open leads,

roaring on the sagging ice

me holding tight your waist & leaning into

hairpin turns

we weaved around downed timber

just on the edge of ice, oh

the water is deep there;

.

the taste of air and the smell of cold, sucked

my breath away. words .

more words collected to describe

these northern myths with clarity & precision

my river walking is

re-writing the story, again

opening me like a new motherhood, showing clearly

where my lines break/into/

a hopeful and cavernous space to breathe.

.

Monica Devine:  Writer, Photographer, Nature Lover

What keeps me afloat: Exploring art, playing music, living in the mountains, wandering (following the trail ahead), wondering (looking up at the stars)…and writing it all down to share here, with you. I write poetry, children’s books, fiction, memoir, and non-fiction, because, we are so much more than muscle and bone: We Are Made of Our Stories.
I consistently wander off the beaten path, and I GO NOWHERE WITHOUT MY CAMERA
MONICA DEVINE
All photos and entries are copyrighted by author and cannot be used without permission


 

Monica Devine’s Poetry and Pictures

The Ancestress

I am an old woman sitting on the beach
pink scarf   holding back   windblown hair

a mother makes bird calls
to her children playing

they come running whistling   a secret code
huh.  a family of birds
beating wings   forever young.

growing up was a long paddle then
slicing the wind   feeling the board   slip
out from under you

fallingdown, standing up

falling down, standingup

wave riders make their own delight
like babies   learning   to walk.

the sea pitches windflower caps
in harmony with   ringing sand    underfoot

you hear the possibility of
pure clarity, good health

though season’s children don’t recognize
these   sad    retreats.

water builds and fills your ears

for you are now    swimming  with the ancients

glancing back
from time to time   you preen
to shore up morale?

 

I am an old woman sitting
on the beach
pink scarf     holding back windblown hair

I’ll sleep high in a monkey pod tree tonight

legs dangling in silk trousers,
butter cookies in a tin under my arm

dreaming of the young long boarder on her knees

paddling smooth strokes & with
fluid grace punching through

the    wild surf  of her youth.

MONICA DEVINE
Writer, Photographer, Nature Lover
What keeps me afloat: Exploring art, playing music, living in the mountains, wandering (following the trail ahead), wondering (looking up at the stars)…and writing it all down to share here, with you. I write poetry, children’s books, fiction, memoir, and non-fiction, because, we are so much more than muscle and bone: We Are Made of Our Stories.
I consistently wander off the beaten path, and I GO NOWHERE WITHOUT MY CAMERA
All photos and entries are copyrighted by author and cannot be used without permission

Reflections on Ahimsa from our friend in Alaska

Monica Devine

Monica Devine is an author, photographer, therapist, and baby boomer who lives in Eagle River, Alaska. She also studies and practices yoga – one of the most beneficial practices (spiritual and physical) for women over 50. Today, Monica reminds us of what yoga teaches us about Ahimsa.

Ahimsa means to do no harm; to practice non-violence. When non-violence in speech, thought and action is established, one’s aggressive nature is relinquished, and others abandon hostility in one’s presence.

This is one of the teachings in the Yoga Sutras that I’ve given a great deal of thought to lately. Have you ever noticed how angry speech begets defensive behavior? How violent behavior begets retaliation? We see this on the world stage, between nations and cultures at war with one another. And we also see it on a smaller scale at home with the people we love most.

Explosive anger and negative speech towards another creates a climate of defensiveness and hurt that can last for years. Sticks and stones may break your bones? Sure, but violent and aggressive speech toward another is just as damaging. I remember my sons resorting to shouting matches and highly charged fighting when they were younger, the days when sibling rivalry was intense. This was a highly stressful time for me as a parent; I’d immediately get sucked into their disagreements and feel I had to diffuse the argument with an even louder voice; I had to take control, offer a quick solution, make everything okay again. But in doing so, I was trying to bring about peace in a way that wasn’t, in and of itself, peaceful. So I began to examine these behaviors by practicing staying in the midst of an argument and remaining peaceful inside. By pulling myself aside mentally, breathing deep and slow, and staying consciously aware of the encounter, a neutral ground was established where emotions were not allowed to run amok. Over time, I learned to shape the encounter, rather than control it, and to calmly shift the responsibility for a resolution back on them rather than carry it myself. When I spoke softer, so did they. When I offered and modeled an alternative way to communicate, they responded. This was a huge accomplishment for all of us and took years to hone.

Monica & Mt. Drum

Kind speech begets kind speech. Carrying the thought of peace in our hearts naturally invites a more loving and clearer expression from others. We would do well to remember that families are microcosms of nations. The knowledge and courage required to lay down our sticks and stones and practice daily the essential and vital energy of peace, starts at home, with ourselves.

If you want to hear more about Monica and her life in Alaska where she writes about about art, nature, travel, and more, visit her at her very own blog.

Multi-media piece of my Mom by Monica Devine